John Gordon Replinger: The Art and Craft of Dwelling

This Friday, the School of Architecture at the University of Illinois will present an exhibition and program about three mid-century architects, including John Replinger. Here are the details:

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Art Education and Vino Van Gogh

Stacey is in her 20-somethingth year as a high school art teacher. She is forever revamping her curriculum—throwing out what doesn’t work and bringing in new ideas from her reading in the pedagogy of art. One method often used in art is the recipe-driven approach in which the students combine art ingredients and copy a successful composition to produce acceptable, even beautiful, pieces. The commercially successful Vino Van Gogh uses this approach:

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Here is a sample of the kinds of images that participants might paint:

Vino Van Gogh

Of course, Stacey is doing more than that. She is asking her beginning and intermediate high school students to create their own art, in this case to illustrate a song. Here’s what she drew out last night  for “American Pie.”

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Zoe as Pauline in West Side Story

Daughter Zoe is performing her last show in the Quad Cities, at least for a while, this week. She plays a Jet girl, Pauline, in the Quad Cities Music Guild’s production of West Side Story. Although she has a small role in the ensemble, she’s enjoying her time working (playing) with several actors she’s appeared with before, notably Joseph and Noelle.

The Quad City Times recently published a portfolio of photos about the show, a few if which featured Zoe. The show runs through this weekend, July 12 through 16.

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Zoe Replinger, Illustration

Zoe is presenting a Powerpoint talk today. Here is the illustration she did.

"Behold, how good and how pleasant it is, for brothers to dwell together in unity!" Psalm 133:1, March 2017, Marker, 8 x 11 in.

“Behold, how good and how pleasant it is, for brothers to dwell together in unity!” Psalm 133:1, March 2017, Marker, 8 x 11 in.

Dot Replinger’s Newest Fiber Art

Dot has recently produced a couple of new pieces. She created the first one by reassembling woven elements from wall hangings that she did years ago. The second piece is also a reworking of an older piece.

Dot Replinger, 2017, fiber, 12 x 36 in.

Dot Replinger, 2017, fiber, 12 x 36 in.

Dot Replinger, 2017, fiber, 24 x 24 in.

Dot Replinger, 2017, fiber, 24 x 24 in.

Museum Tour, Saint Louis Art Museum, Part 2, Abstract Paintings

This post continues recounting of our recent (over the last six months) visits to art museums.  This entry is the second about the art museum in St. Louis, which we visited in October 2016. The first describes landscapes; this second post focuses on another personal interest, abstracts. The paintings are ordered the date of their creation, from the 1930s to the 1980s.

I don’t know what the first piece is, but we had fun looking through it and taking pics of each other.

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Jean Helion (FR), Composition, 1933, oil Admirer of Mondrian explored the complexities of the curved form.

Jean Helion (FR), Composition, 1933, oil
Admirer of Mondrian explored the complexities of the curved form.

Piet Mondrian (NE), Composition of Red and White, NOM 1 / Composition no. 4 with red and blue, 1938-42, oil

Piet Mondrian (NE), Composition of Red and White, NOM 1 / Composition no. 4 with red and blue, 1938-42, oil

Emilio Vedova (IT), Factory, 1949, oil Inspired by the geometric forms of factories.

Emilio Vedova (IT), Factory, 1949, oil
Inspired by the geometric forms of factories.

Franz Kline (USA), Bethlehem, 1959-60, oil Named many of his abstract paintings after towns and counties in Pennsylvania.

Franz Kline (USA), Bethlehem, 1959-60, oil
Named many of his abstract paintings after towns and counties in Pennsylvania.

Gene Davis (ISA), Kenyatta, 1965-66, oil Title likely inspired by the name of first president of Kenya.

Gene Davis (ISA), Kenyatta, 1965-66, oil
Title likely inspired by the name of first president of Kenya.

Gerhard Richter (GE), title: January 1989, oil Created by dragging large squeegee spatulas across the canvas, applying new paint while scraping off old.

Gerhard Richter (GE), title: January 1989, oil
Created by dragging large squeegee spatulas across the canvas, applying new paint while scraping off old.

Gunther Forg (GE), Rivoli 1, 1989, oil

Gunther Forg (GE), Rivoli 1, 1989, oil

Museum Tour: Saint Louis Art Museum, Part 1, Landscapes

On a warm Saturday last October (2016), Stacey and I had a free morning in St. Louis while daughter Zoe took her college entrance exam at the local community college. Naturally, we visited the Saint Louis Art Museum. The museum was founded in 1879, in the decade when many large cities in the eastern half of the country established art museums. The main building, designed by Cass Gilbert, was built for the 1904 World’s Fair. The addition of 2013 was designed by David Chipperfield, who designed our local art museum, the Figge in Davenport, Iowa.

Two outstanding attributes of the museum are its site in expansive Forest Park, a few mile west of downtown, and its free admission, every day.

This first post focuses on landscape paintings that we viewed, an area of particular interest to me. I’ll have images of other notable art in another post.

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"Apotheosis of St. Louis," which stands at the front entrance to the museum, is a statue of King Louis IX of France,

Apotheosis of St. Louis, Charles Nieuhaus, 1904-06. The statue of King Louis IX of France stands at the front entrance to the museum.

Maurice de Vlaminck, Le Havre: Le Grand Quzi, 1906. The artist was one of the fauves, or wild beasts, who used pure, unmixed colors.

Maurice de Vlaminck, Le Havre: Le Grand Quzi, 1906. The artist was one of the fauves, or wild beasts, who used pure, unmixed colors.

Robert Delaunay, 1924, Eiffel Tower.

Robert Delaunay, 1924, Eiffel Tower.

Max Beckmann, The Harbor of Genoa, 1927.

Max Beckmann, The Harbor of Genoa, 1927.

E.L. Kirchner, 1927-28, View of Basel and the Rhine.

E.L. Kirchner, 1927-28, View of Basel and the Rhine.

Joe Jones, River Front (Saint Louis Levee), 1932.

Joe Jones, River Front (Saint Louis Levee), 1932.

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Joe Jones, View of St. Louis, 1932.

Ralston Crawford, Coal Elevators, 1938.

Ralston Crawford, Coal Elevators, 1938.

 

Museum Tour: Hunter Museum of American Art, Chattanooga

On our way back to Illinois from Florida, we visited the lively downtown of Chattanooga on a warmish late-December Day. Owing to our indoor rock-climbing session and the long drive that we had to make later in the day back to Illinois, we didn’t get inside the museum. But we had a fine walk along the Tennessee River, through the museum’s sculpture park, and to the Bluff View Arts District.

According to its web page, “The Hunter Museum focuses on American art from the Colonial period to the present day. The variety of the collection inside is reflected by the architecture of the museum’s exterior. The museum is housed in an early twentieth century mansion, a modern 1970s era building and a sleek, contemporary structure of steel and glass.”

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View from the southwest showing the 2005 addition by Randall Stout and the original classical revival mansion (1904).

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Plaque describes the three sections of the museum. The East Wing (1975), designed by the local firm Derthick and Henley, is an example of brutalism. It celebrates the clean lines of American abstraction and advances in concrete slab construction.

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Another plaque shows the view from above the river and highlights the East Wing.

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“Blue Trees” and a Butterfield horse flank the main entrance to the museum at the West Wing.

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The addition won an award for Innovative Design in Engineering and Architecture with Structural Steels.

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Sculpture by artist unknown (to me), looking west over Tennessee River.

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Pitcher preparing to throw. John Dreyfuss, “Full Count,” bronze, 1990.

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Zoe stepping into the action to call balls and strikes.

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William King, “Adolescence,” 1982.

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Konstatin Dimopoulos, “Blue Trees,” 2016. In this installation that occurs at the museum as well as along the river walk, electric blue water-based colorant temporarily transforms trees into a surrealistic landscape.

 

Museum Tour: Eskenazi Museum of Art, Indiana University

We’ve visited several art museums over the past several months. With this post, I’ll try to catch up on what we’ve seen. In early February we did a college visit to Indiana University in Bloomington. The art collection is housed in a large, architecturally significant building designed by I.M. Pei (1982). The featured exhibit was by Vik Muniz, a Brazilian-American photographer. “Working with a dizzying array of unconventional materials—including sugar, tomato sauce, diamonds, magazine clippings, chocolate syrup, dust, and junk—he painstakingly constructs 3-D pictures before recording them with his camera,” according to the press release. See below the photograph he made of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater

The permanent collection includes pieces by several well-known artists, among them Picasso, Monet, Calder, Morris Louis, Rockwell, and Pollock. Here are images of the museum and art that I liked.

Museum façade and current exhibit poster.

Museum façade and current exhibit poster.

Museum atrium.

Museum atrium.

Stacey and Vik Muniz's Matchbox XKE Jaguar.

Stacey and Vik Muniz’s Matchbox XKE Jaguar.

Fallingwater (Kaufman Residence), from Picture of Chocolate, 2009, dye destruction print.

Fallingwater (Kaufman Residence), from Picture of Chocolate, 2009, dye destruction print.

Louis, Pollock, and sculpture.

Louis, Pollock, and sculpture.

Morris Louis, known for his color field paintings.

Morris Louis.

Jackson Pollock, Number 11, 1949.

Jackson Pollock, Number 11, 1949.

Alexander Calder maquette.

Alexander Calder maquette.

August Macke, Forest Stream (Waldbach), 1910. French Fauvism + the natural world.

August Macke, Forest Stream (Waldbach), 1910. French Fauvism + the natural world.

Gustafson’s City of Mills Mural

Bill Gustafson painted this historically accurate scene of early Moline in 2009. In the scene from 1848, John Deere appears in the red shirt. The mural depicts perhaps the most important event in the early history of the city, as did Gustafson’s similar mural of Rock Island, described in an earlier post: https://replingerarts.wordpress.com/2016/09/25/historical-mural-in-the-quad-cities/.

Moline walking tour leader and geographer Curt Roseman includes this site both as a way to explain the city’s early history and as a relevant current urban space.

For more about Gustafson’s work, see http://www.gustafsonart.com/murals-city.php.

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City of Mills Bill Gustafson, 2009

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